Nymphenburg Palace, Germany – Monday

Monday morning, August 14, we packed up and left Rothenburg, and continued (in the correct direction), down the Romantishe Strasse, towards Munich. Outside of Munich is Schloss Nymphenburg, which belonged to, among others, Ludwig I. The castle is immense and sprawling, with huge grounds. It was a little hard to find, because we didn’t have any good maps of Munich that had the palace on it. We had a general idea on which side of the city it was, and we aimed for that and hoped for signs. And we managed to find it!

Here are some pics of the outside of the castle and the grounds.

castle1

castle2

castle3

castle4

castle5

castle6

castle7

castle8

castle9

castle10

castle11

castle12

Before tackling the castle, we managed to find lunch at a restaurant on-site – it was kind of expensive and no one but one waiter spoke English – he was nice enough to tranlate the menu for us, because it was harder than the average menu to figure out. We ended up splitting a creamy tomato and a creamy herb soup and a Caesar salad, and got chocolate mousse for dessert. It was very good!

The first room you see inside is this gorgeous, huge high-ceilinged hall:

hall1

hall2

hall3

hall4

hall5

hall6

And the ceiling had a beautiful mural on it! I couldn’t take flash pics inside but this hall was very light, so I didn’t need it. The rest of my pictures suffered a bit for lack of a flash.

hall7

hall8

hall9

hall10

hall11

hall12

hall13

Here are some other pics of things inside the other rooms. The ceilings were often beautifully painted. I tried to get some pics of them. I think the last one is a painting of Madame Du Barry.

misc1

misc2

misc3

misc4

misc5

misc6

misc7

The other thing the castle has is the Beauty Gallery – a collection of paintings that Ludwig had done of beautiful girls – all one lovelier than the other. Ludwig prized beauty as a virtue and had a portrait painter who would paint these girls/women in the same style. The paintings were publicly displayed.

The other remarkable thing was that not all the girls were princesses or rich – one of the prettiest, Helene Sedelmeyer, was a delivery girl for a toy store. The king ran into her and picked her to be painted for the gallery.

beauty4

Here’s a website that shows some of the portraits: http://www.marquise.de/en/1800/arte/stieler.shtml.

Here I am, listening to the audio tour, and taking pictures! Doug is in back of me, to the left!

me

And here are some of my pics of them that came out. I didn’t get all the portraits that were there, like Helene’s unfortunately.

beauty1

beauty2

beauty3

wall1

wall2

wall3

wall4

wall5

wall6

Here are some more interior pics:

misc8

misc9

misc10

misc11

misc12

misc13

misc14

misc15

misc16

misc17

misc18

misc19

misc20

On the way out, I couldn’t help taking a few more pics of the main hall:

hall14

hall15

hall16

hall17

hall18

hall19

Here is the view out the front door. We went out, down, and around to the back, where the gardens are.

fountain

The grounds are huge, and my knees were still bad at this point – but I didn’t want to miss the gorgeously decorated smaller buildings laid out around the grounds!

Here is the back of the palace:

back

back2

back3

There are a number of statues in the front of the park that I think are supposed to be the vices and virtues. Uh, I don’t remember eating babies as one of the vices, but ok!

garden1

statue1

statue2

statue3

statue4

The first building we saw on the grounds is the Pagodenburg, which is octagonal and docorated with a blue and white Asian motif. It was lovely! According to wikipedia, the Pagodenburg is “an octagonal, two story pavilion with Delft tile decoration downstairs and Chinoiserie upstairs. It was built by Joseph Effner”, a German architect and decorator.

pagodenburg1

Here is the downstairs:

pagodenburg2

pagodenburg3

pagodenburg4

pagodenburg5

And the stairwell and upstairs:

pagodenburg6

pagodenburg7

pagodenburg8

pagodenburg9

pagodenburg10

pagodenburg11

pagodenburg12

pagodenburg13

Here is the view from the Pagodenburg:

view1

And here is a view of the Pagodenburg, as we kept walking/limping towards our next stop:

pagodenburg14

And you can see how far from the Palace we are!

view2

view3

view4

Next up was the Badenburg, which was a “bath house”. Everything is kind of “bath” themed. And there is a huge tiled 2 story pool! The Badenburg is, according to wikipedia, “a baroque pavilion also by Joseph Effner, contains a very large tiled bath and various Chinese wallpapers”.

badenburg1

badenburg2

badenburg3

badenburg4

badenburg5

badenburg6

badenburg7

badenburg8

badenburg9

badenburg10

badenburg11

badenburg12

Here is the pool room. The blue tiled part would be under water, which it isn’t here.

pool1

pool2

pool3

pool4

pool5

pool6

pool7

pool8

pool9

Next it was on to the Amalienburg, which wikipedia says is “a rococo hunting lodge constructed in 1734-1739 by Francois de Cuvilles for Charles VII and his wife, Maria Amalia, including a hall of mirrors and a kennel room for the hunting dogs”. It has a huge mirrored ballroom, which would have been beautiful with people dancing in it in period clothes!

amalienburg1

amalienburg2

amalienburg3

amalienburg4

amalienburg5

amalienburg6

amalienburg7

amalienburg8

amalienburg9

amalienburg10

amalienburg11

amalienburg12

amalienburg13

amalienburg14

amalienburg15

amalienburg16

amalienburg17

amalienburg18

amalienburg19

amalienburg20

amalienburg21

amalienburg22

amalienburg23

And the Prinzengarten:

barn1

barn2

After the castle, we got back on the road and headed for Oberammergau – the scenery changed from rolling hills, reminiscent of Pennsylvania, to huge mountains reminscent of Colorado!

drive1

We got turned around a bit in Oberammergau, but that’s because the map cut off part of the highway, and we weren’t sure where we turned into the town. But we find the hotel eventually and it’s clean enough, but smells of smoke – not very great. We seem to be near the middle of the town, though, which is nice. We walked across the street and found an Italian place. The guy didn’t speak any EEnlish, though the menu was in Italian and German. We tried to order gnocci, but they didn’t seem to have any. At least that’s what we interpreted. Finally, he suggested something that sounded like baked ziti, so we ordered that, and a small pizza. It all tasted really good and was a nice change.

Here are a few pics of Oberommergau, including the cute Red Riding Hood House!

ober1

ober2

ober3

Tags: